Home / Health & Fitness Trends / CPPC Spotlight: Dr. Mac Nwosu

CPPC Spotlight: Dr. Mac Nwosu

Name: Mac Nwosu
Age: 29
Location: Houston, TX

What was your first thought when you learned about the Coaching & Training Women Academy and the Pre- & Postnatal Coaching Certification?
I was over the moon! I found out about the certification while listening to a podcast that featured Molly Galbraith and Marika Hart. I was thrilled because I had begun to develop a concept of a physical therapy practice focused on pre- and postnatal clients. However, I was terrified about how to treat them and this was just what I needed.

What do you do?
I am a sport and women’s health physical therapist, as well as a certified strength and conditioning specialist. I will become a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists in 2018 and have completed Fellowship Training through the Institute for Athlete Regeneration. I am a member of the American Physical Therapy Association Sports and Women’s Health Section, Texas Physical Therapy Association, and American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists.

What else do you do?
I have been working to develop my physical therapy practice, so that takes up a lot of my time. When I’m not working, I spend a lot of time with my wife going to movies, concerts and relaxing. I also enjoy listening to podcasts on several topics, including but not limited to business, fitness, health and wellness

Best compliment you’ve received lately:
Lately, a patient referred to me as a good listener and communicator.

Most recent compliment you gave someone else:
I recently gave a compliment to a patient about their ability to take direction. I try my best to avoid “overcoaching” so this particular client was able to take cues with limited cueing and coaching from me.

Favorite way to treat yourself: 
I honestly enjoy relaxing, so when I have time, I enjoy getting a massage.

Three words that best describe you:  
Hardworking. Loyal. Trustworthy.

Favorite quote:  

If you don’t build your dream someone will hire you to help build theirs. — Tony Gaskins Jr.

What inspires and motivates you?  
I am inspired and motivated by seeing other people succeed. It makes me happy to see people reach their goals. I am mostly motivated by my family: my parents sacrificed everything to give me every opportunity to succeed, and I have done my best to take every advantage. My wife believes in me and took a chance marrying me, even when I did not have a job. So, I take every opportunity to grow in order to make them proud.

Describe a typical day in your life, from waking up to bedtime:
My typical day varies based on the day of the week, however on average, I wake up at 4:55 a.m. and get ready for the day. After that, I get on my computer to get some studying done, and work on content, then it’s off to work. I listen to podcasts on my commute and arrive to work where I see patients. When I have a late start, I try to get into the gym before the day begins. During my lunch break, I continue where I left off on content creation or editing while listening to podcasts.

The second part of the day ends after seeing more patients and clients. On the way home, I may talk to my wife or spend some time in silence decompressing. After arriving home and eating dinner, I typically have a webinar to watch or a mastermind group call. If it’s not too late, I may watch some television, relax and go to sleep.

What situation in your life lead you to enroll in the CPPC?
I was a physical therapist for about two years and began to feel disenchanted with the daily grind. As a physical therapy student, I garnered an interest in women’s health and the pelvic floor. After visiting with professors and researching prominent influencers in the field, I noticed specialists were few and far between. Upon further thought, I saw myself lacking a path to gain knowledge to treat or care for these patients.

As crucial as this specialty is, there aren’t enough physical therapists to handle the care of fifty percent of the population.

I just took a course from the American Physical Therapy Association Section on Women’s Health and was completely invested in furthering my education. As I mentioned earlier, I am a fan of podcasts and while listening to a pelvic health podcast, I was intrigued by the content provided by the certification. After discussing with mentors and colleagues, as well as emailing with GGS, it was a no-brainer. The CPPC would give me the knowledge I needed to treat and coach this population.

As a male, I have no part to play in bringing a child into the world after initial conception. Hence, I have decided I would play a role in caring and treating women who suffer from dysfunctions during and post pregnancy. My contribution is to listen, understand and create a solution for any problems that I see in the clinic. I am on a constant journey to learn and grow my knowledge to effectively and efficiently return the patient to optimal health.

As my wife and I expect our first child, I have experienced the challenge of conceiving and the sadness after another month without a positive result. After successful conception, I have learned to be a listening ear to the struggles of pregnant women and the difficulties that come with the transformation. I have also attained knowledge from colleagues and friends who are currently in their postpartum phase, and my heart breaks that they have to struggle due to lack of access to proper care.

These factors led me to pursue post-professional education to treat patients similar to my wife and my friends. It is my mission that no woman should suffer from musculoskeletal pain or dysfunction due to lack of qualified professionals. I have immersed myself in education from numerous sources that have taught me to listen, treat and support patients that present with pain and dysfunctions due to pregnancy and post-partum.

How would you describe your pre- and postnatal knowledge before taking CPPC?
I had very little pre- and postnatal knowledge before the CPPC. I knew simple things like don’t lay on your back after the first trimester, but I was ignorant for the most part. I was hurt when I had to stop working with a patient because I didn’t know how to treat her after she became pregnant, so I vowed to never repeat that situation due to a lack of knowledge.

Why do you think learning the information that’s included in the CPPC is so important to your profession?
The information has been a great addition and was important to my profession because it gave me the knowledge and mindset to coach this population.

What’s been the best part about going through the CPPC?
The best part of going through the CPPC were the chapters detailing the trimesters and themes through each trimester and how to manage patients and clients. The textbook is so comprehensive that I can reference it for any issue regarding pregnancy.

Now that you’re an official Certified Pre- & Postnatal Coach, what impact are you hoping to have?
Now that I am officially certified, I plan to incorporate my newly acquired knowledge in my physical therapy practice and begin a wellness practice for healthy and active women.

What effect has your new Certification had on your business so far?
There are no measurable effects at this point on my business, however, I have been able to enter a niche that is underserved. It is a shame there aren’t more fitness professionals with the skills and knowledge to serve these patients. I have been able to network virtually with other certified professionals on methods to improve my business. I plan to use the network to learn and grow as a business owner as well as a coach.

How has your thinking about pre- and postnatal care changed since completing the CPPC?
The CPPC has lived up to every expectation, I was most amazed by the contributors from OB/GYNs to other physical therapists, nutritionists and coaches. The combined wealth of knowledge in one place was an extremely valuable resource.

What would you say to someone who’s on the fence about enrolling?
For those on the fence, I say why not? Invest in yourself.

This program can help coaches, trainers and physical therapists at any level. It is not only for those who plan to work with pre- and postnatal clients, it can also benefit anyone who wants to work with females.

The coaching section can help educate the fitness professional on words and phrases that can motivate and teach words that have the opposite effect. I will never lose another client because she became pregnant and I cannot treat her due to my ignorance. CPPC has given me all the tools required to educate, train and motivate my pre- and postnatal clients and patients. This is an investment in yourself and all your future clients. I recommend the CPPC without hesitation.

You can connect with Mac on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

The post CPPC Spotlight: Dr. Mac Nwosu appeared first on Girls Gone Strong.

Click Here For Original Source Of The Article

About Mehmood Esmail

Mehmood Esmail
Hi, I am Mehmood Esmail, there have been severe health issues in my family, like cancer, heart attacks, stroke, kidney stones, IBS, etc. Where we live, in Africa, health facilities are basic. Thus it becomes imperative that we hnow what is happenining to us and how to look after ourselves, and where possible, how to prevent serious illnesses.

Check Also

Coaching & Training Women Academy Spotlight: Kimberly Boal

Coaching & Training Women Academy Spotlight: Kimberly Boal

Name: Kimberly Boal Age: 52 Location: Pennsylvania What was your first thought when you learned about the Coaching & Training Women Academy and the Pre- & Postnatal Coaching Certification? When I first found out about the Coaching & Training Women Academy, I thought “Finally! There is going to be a resource for women, by women where […]

The post Coaching & Training Women Academy Spotlight: Kimberly Boal appeared first on Girls Gone Strong.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

css.php